Tag Archives: birds

Backyard | Raccoon Vandals

We have a bird feeder hanging in the back several feet from any trees. It weighs several pounds due to batteries and a motor that spins the perch if squirrels get on it. It is hung from a rope about 3 meters above the ground by a sturdy carabiner clip.

This morning the feeder was lying on the ground. This is the second time it has happened. The only way to unhook it is to grip the spring clip on the carabiner and lift the feeder support wire out of it. You need hands with a strong grip to do that. We suspect raccoons are the culprit.

First Snow | Cardinal Waits

We have our first snow of the season in Iowa this morning. There is about 3″ on the ground and nearly stopped. I filled the feeders since the birds will find it harder to locate food. This cardinal sat for the longest time in the thicket nearby. I like how he is all fluffed up. Now, he and chickadees, titmouse, nuthatches, woodpeckers, and juncos are busy checking out the new supply.

Cardinalis cardinalis

Cardinalis cardinalis

Our New Neighbors

We watched the progress on the home from our window each day. New building materials were arranged and re-arranged. It seemed to take a long time. Finally, they settled in and seemed content with what they built.

Today, we noticed new neighbors in that home. Tiny Robin heads peeked above the rim of the nest. It was a hot day, too hot to sit on the nest. The youngsters held their mouths open and ready. Mom or Dad stood still. The babies drooped a bit and closed their mouths. A noise or a movement made them gape open again. They will grow fast. We’ll be watching.

2016-0724Robins1

2016-0724Robins2



Update: This image is one week later. The nest is crowded. Eyes are wide open. Ravenous.

2016_0730Robins

Peace | Can’t We Act Better?

by Jim and Melanie

We stepped out the front door into the sunshine for a walk. Nearby were two young doves. They sat very still so we would not see them. Adult doves fly away in an explosion of sound. These sat there until our return.

How nice if they carried a message of peace and harmony between people of Earth. Such terrible things we humans do to each other. Our thoughts and prayers are with our French brothers and sisters today.

Dove1

Dove2

House Finch | Give Me Shelter

I looked out the front window to see how heavily it was raining. The corner of the garage has stucco covered quoins under the eave. Sitting quietly in a notch was a House Finch, eyes closed and dry, waiting for the rain to stop.

House Wren | Welcome Back

I cleaned out the House Wren birdhouse last week to prepare for their arrival this week. This morning a single male could be heard in the bushes out back singing away. More about the singing of House Wrens here. He soon got busy adding new twigs to the house in preparation for arrival of the females. He must do a good job in order to attract a female.

Wren1

 

Most of the twigs were small and fit easily into the small hole. But, now and then he brought one up that was awkward like this one. He tried several different approaches, first one end then the other.

Wren2

 

This stick got the best of him. He seemed quite frustrated with it. Persistence paid off in the end.

Wren3

 

These tiny birds are really busy non-stop. They forage for food. They sing loudly. They are very aggressive toward other birds much larger if they need to be. They scold us at times. Cats are a mortal enemy. No cat can hide in our bushes for long without being found out.

They need lots of energy per unit of volume for their size. It is a concept called surface-to-volume ratio. Here is a link to one of my more popular posts on that topic.

 

Turdus Migratorius and Our Windows

© Debbie McKenzie, AL, September 2008

Here we go again. The American Robin in the spring feels territorial and the need to nest. It comes to our windows, flies up to the glass, taps several times with their beak, before sitting on a nearby branch. After a few minutes, the bird does it again, and again, and again, etc. This goes on for several days.

Why do they do this repetitive window bashing? Some claim they see their reflection and try to ward off another bird from their territory. Some claim they see the reflection of the surroundings in the glass and fly toward it. Maybe they see a dark interior under a protective roofline that would make a dry safe nest site. Those are each plausible. Whatever the reason, turdus migratorius is a slow learner.

We’ve tried different strategies to discourage their behavior. Most don’t work. We shake the curtains. The robin flies away and returns later or goes to a different window. We hang teddy bears or animal figures with big eyes. The robins don’t seem to care. This year I tried drawing a big face on a sheet of paper. That didn’t work. Notice how well the trees and sky are reflected. This window is more problematic than most.

Robin2

 

Another window has a Vendetta mask hanging in it. Robins don’t seem to appreciate the finer points of literature and history. It looks kind of weird. I wonder what the neighbors think.

Robin1